Featured OPCE Authored Resources

Reframing the Obesity ConversationReframing the Obesity Conversation
How obesity is described, or framed, can affect whether a solution has popular or decision-maker support. Learn more about reframing the conversation.

 

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All CHSC Related Resources

Included in the collection are informational materials and tools. To search by title, use the main search box located at the top of this page.

NYS Health Impact Statements

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) is pleased to announce the release of four new Health Impact Statements: “Increasing Physical Activity at Schools in New York State”, “Improving Nutrition at Schools in New York State”, “Implementing Food Standards in New York State”, and “Increasing Breastfeeding in New York State”. From 2013-2018, NYS DOH received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address the problem of obesity by increasing physical activity opportunities for students; improving the nutrition environment for students; implementing food service guidelines at community sites including work places, hospitals, municipalities and community-based organizations; and promoting, supporting and protecting breastfeeding in hospitals, health care practices, worksites and community organizations. The attached reports summarize the impact that this funding had on children and adults in NYS. Each report includes a description of the problem, the intervention, and the health impact. These reports have been approved for public use. Feel free to share them with partners or colleagues that are involved in initiatives to decrease obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and increase breastfeeding.

Frequent Routes to Funding

This fact sheet describes key steps to ensure your program is well positioned for funding, provides ideas for where to look for funding, and highlights the breadth of funding sources that programs from around the country are currently accessing.

Keep Calm and Carry On to School

A new infobrief, Keep Calm and Carry On to School: Improving Arrival and Dismissal for Walking and Biking, provides information on how schools, districts, cities, counties, and community partners can address arrival and dismissal in school travel plans as well as other planning, policy, and programming efforts.

Social Determinants of Health

This website provides CDC resources for SDOH data, tools for action, programs, and policy. They may be used by people in public health, community organizations, and health care systems to assess SDOH and improve community well-being.

Fast Facts

The documents found at the links below provide facts from up-to-date studies and “fast facts” written in consumer friendly language. To reduce review time, materials developed using facts from these documents exactly as they are written will not need additional science review, which will reduce the overall product review time.

ESSA Resources

Right now, every state is putting together a comprehensive plan to ensure all students receive a fair, equitable, and high-quality education. These plans are required by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), recently passed by Congress. To help every student succeed, Voices for Healthy Kids is advocating for physical education to be included in every state’s ESSA plans. PE addresses the needs of the whole child, positively impacting their physical, mental and emotional health, making it a critical part of every child’s education. The resources below can help deliver an important message to education leaders in your state:

Kid Power Ups

Kid Power Ups are short, interactive videos that get kids dancing and moving—the ideal brain break to help kids re-focus and learn more. These activity breaks also help other children around the world. It’s a winning combination of kids-helping-kids, and teachers and students all over the U.S. are loving it!

Let’s Go For A Walk

Check out this new, free walking audit toolkit from Safe Routes To School National Partnership. Walk audits can be informal and casual, or can include city councilmembers, traffic engineers, and detailed forms. In this toolkit, they give you the tools to hold your own walk audit that will help you achieve the goals of your community.

Get Rolling With a Bike Train Program

This handout covers frequently asked questions for starting a bike train program. This resource is great for school staff and principals!

With a bike train, a group of students bike to school together, accompanied by adults who make sure students stay safe and have fun. A bike train is a fun and easy way for kids to
safely get physical activity on the way to or from school and a great way for students who live too far to conveniently walk to participate in Safe Routes to School.

The Wheels on the Bike Go Round & Round

As more and more people are bicycling in the United States, a bike train can be a strong part of a larger Safe Routes to School program, initiatives that thousands of communities across the nation are establishing.

The purpose of this guide is to provide a simple description of how to plan and organize a bike train. This guide outlines how to put together and run a bike train program at your school, including initial planning considerations, logistics, promotion, training, and evaluation. The guide has tried-and-true methods, resources, and templates to get you off to a quick start. Whether you are familiar with Safe Routes to School or it is brand new to you, this guide will get you on your way, pedaling toward a successful bike train program.

Springboard to Active Schools

Springboard to Active Schools’ new website has data, resources, and information to support physical activity at state, district, and local levels.

Out-of-School Time Toolkit

A new out-of-school time toolkit has information and resources to support kids to be physically active even when school is not in session.

Training Modules for PE Teachers

If you are currently relying on a “day-to-day” lesson strategy in your physical education classroom or are looking to update your existing PE curriculum, this series of five individual e-courses is for you!

Springboard to Active Schools Data Brief: Strengthen Physical Education in Schools

Physical education is an academic subject and is part of a well-rounded education. While many states require K-12 students to participate in some level of physical education, many physical education practices can be improved to help students meet the national recommendation of engaging in at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily. Physical education has a positive impact on students’ physical, mental, and emotional health. Students who take physical education build the ability, confidence, and desire to continue to be active in adulthood. “Strengthen Physical Education in Schools” provides partners in both the education and public health fields with national data that describes the state of physical education in schools in the United States, and identifies key policies and practices that school districts and schools can put in place to promote and strengthen physical education.

Springboard to Active Schools Data Brief: Keep Recess in Schools

As part of the Springboard to Active Schools initiative, NNPHI collaborated with Health Resources in Action and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop “Keep Recess in Schools.” Intended for partners in both the education and public health fields, this brief shares national data describing trends in the state of recess in U.S. schools. The brief also identifies key policies and practices that school districts and schools can apply and implement to promote and implement recess. Read this brief to learn more about the definition of recess, get a snapshot of current recess practices in the United States, and explore national guidance and practical strategies to improve recess.

Get Up and Get Groovin’ – Classroom Physical Activity Breaks Tracker

“We know all kids should get 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Physical activity in the classroom as a great way to help your
students meet these minutes! Strive to incorporate at least 10 minutes of daily physical activity through movement breaks in your
classroom. Teachers can download the Action for Healthy Kids Classroom Physical Activity Tracker. Teachers can post it in a visible location and assign a student to fill it out at the end of each day.”

Healthy School Pledge

Schools can make the Action for Healthy Kids Healthy School Pledge. Encourage posting the signed pledge on a bulletin board in the hallway.

PE + Health = Student Success

This Shape America infographic can help communicate the impact of physical activity on academic performance, one of many free downloadable posters and infographics.

Teacher’s Toolbox

Shape America’s Teacher’s Toolkbox has tons of free resources about physical education, including adapted PE.

Healthy Schools Action Toolkit from NYC DOHMH

The newly released Healthy Schools Action Toolkit provides resources for elementary school administration, staff, families, and wellness councils. The Center for Health Equity has designed a toolkit to help schools create School Wellness Councils and School Wellness Policies to improve the health of the school community. As part of the toolkit, there are resources for principals, teachers, parents and students that will help: Promote Active Living: Ensure students get 60 minutes of daily physical activity through physical education, active recess, classroom physical activity breaks, active transportation to and from school and before- and after-school physical activity programs; and Promote Healthy Eating: Start by removing chocolate milk from your school menu to reduce the amount of sugar children consume daily. Serve plain (unflavored) 1% or skim milk instead.

Tools of Change: A Resource Catalog for Community Health

ChangeLab Solutions created a new catalog of resources for laws and policies to ensure everyday health for all, including access to affordable and healthy food and beverages and creating safe opportunities for physical activity.

Strategies for Recess in Schools

CDC and Shape America have developed new guidance documents that provide schools with 19 evidence-based strategies for recess, as well as a planning guide and template to help develop a written recess plan.

Fighting for Equitable Transportation Fact Sheet

The Safe Routes to School National Partnership recently published a fact sheet, Fighting for Equitable Transportation: Why it Matters, that explores why safe and convenient walking and biking matter for low-income communities and communities of color. This fact sheet is a companion resource to At the Intersection of Active Transportation and Equity: Joining Forces to Make Communities Healthier and Fairer.

Physical Activity Case Studies

Voices for Healthy Kids and The Safe Routes to School National Partnership have released a series of case studies on successful campaigns to increase physical activity. These new resources share stories of state- and local-level campaigns that have implemented Safe Routes to School, Complete Streets, shared use agreements, environmental justice policies, and more. They provide excellent examples of how communities and organizations can advance policies and programs that institutionalize support for walking, biking, physical activity, and healthy communities. You can access the new case studies in the “Resource” section of the following Voices for Healthy Kids toolkits.

Brain Boosters: Benefits of Physical Activity Breaks

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability published a resource page on brain boosters to give teachers tips for incorporating short, 10-minute or less classroom activities that combine physical activity with classroom learning.

Community Health Media Center Resources

The Community Health Media Center (CHMC) provides free and low-cost advertisements and materials for use by health departments and nonprofit organizations. The advertisements and materials focus on the built environment, nutrition, physical activity, obesity, and other chronic diseases or conditions. The CHMC includes television, radio, print, outdoor (e.g., billboard, transit), and web advertisements; as well as infographics and support materials such as brochures, fact sheets, flyers, posters, postcards. Browse the collection by visiting the CHMC website and creating an account.

Strategies for Recess in Schools

CDC, in collaboration with SHAPE America, developed a document, “Strategies for Recess in Schools,” that outlines strategies for planning and providing recess in schools to help increase participation in physical activity and improve academic achievement. The strategies recommended in this document are based on an environmental scan of recess in schools; were guided by expert researchers, practitioners, and non-governmental organizations; and discussed and reviewed by physical educators, school administrators, and stakeholders.

New Resources for Recess in Schools Promotion Kit

School staff that are responsible for leading recess in schools can use the Strategies for Recess in Schools, Recess Planning in Schools: A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess into Practice, and customizable Recess Planning Template to help them identify what is currently happening or not happening with recess in their school. School staff can then use this information to develop a written recess plan that serves all students. This promotion kit provides an overview of these new resources for recess in schools as well as ideas to promote them. The other resources can be found at these links: Recess Planning Template, Recess Planning in Schools guide, and Strategies for Recess Success in Schools.

Recess Planning Template

Supports schools to customize what is included in the recess plan to reflect their existing priorities and make recess decisions that support the unique culture of their school.

Healthier Middle Schools: Everyone Can Help

Healthier Middle Schools: Everyone Can Help is a series of communication tools designed to help you engage teachers, principals, parents, food service managers and students in school wellness efforts. To support healthy food choices and physical activity at your school, a school-wide coordinated approach works best. USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is providing these resources under its Team Nutrition initiative to help you bring everyone together to promote student wellness and prevent childhood obesity.

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide

The National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) has created model policy language around physical activity in schools for replication and dissemination. This document is intended for school wellness advocates and school administrators.

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: School and Local Government Collaborations

The Local Government Commission and the Cities, Counties, and Schools Partnership produced this fact sheet in April 2007 showing how collaborative efforts between government officials and schools can join forces to reduce childhood obesity. It provides research resources and eight specific examples of policies (some of which are safe routes to schools initiatives), join use agreement, community garden programs, and fast food zoning policies.

Healthy Community Design and Access to Healthy Food Legislation Database

This database of the National Conference of State Legislatures is a valuable tool for anyone interested in state-level legislation related to active living and healthy eating. Users can search by state, topic area(s), year, bill type, bill status, and/or bill number. The website also has a text search feature. This database can be used to develop local policy language and check that local policies are in line with state policies.

A Checklist: Elements of a Great Recess

See this checklist for a list of considerations for what makes great recess. The checklist includes elements relevant to time, play space, games, rules, staff, student empowerment, positive school environment, and ideas for indoor recess.

Active Indoor Recess

This training provides concrete examples of how to engage students for indoor recess.

CHLI Assessment

Community Healthy Living Index (CHLI) contains assessments for six key community settings: afterschool child care sites, early childhood programs, neighborhoods, schools, work sites and the community at large. Each assessment contains questions about policies and practices that support healthy lifestyles. Each question provides a “best practice” or improvement idea for sites to implement

CDC CHANGE Tool

This CHANGE tool helps community teams (such as coalitions) develop their community action plan. This tool walks community team members through the assessment process and helps define and prioritize possible areas of improvement. Community-At-Large Sector, Community Institution/Organization Sector; Health Care Sector; School Sector; Work Site Sector

Safe Routes to School National Partnership

This website offers depth of expertise, a national support network, and know-how to help make communities and schools safer, healthier, and more active. Includes factsheets, guides, publications, webinars and more related to SRTS, shared use, healthy communities and active transportation

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) are an essential resource for health professional and policymakers. Based on the latest science, they provide guidance on how children and adults can improve their health through physical activity. It also provides ways to help consumers understand the benefits of physical activity and how to make it a part of their regular routine.

Physical Education Program Checklist

This Physical Education Program Checklist is designed to help school administrators, principals, teachers and
parents review their schools’ physical education programs to ensure that they are addressing what SHAPE America
has identified as the “essential components” of physical education.

School Wellness Resource Kit

This comprehensive guide provides tools to assess and improve the school, classroom, and home environment, as well as staff wellness through the lens of two school districts in Colorado.

Joint Use Toolkit

This guide is designed to help school staff and community leaders craft and implement joint use agreements. It includes model language and success stories, as well as financing strategies.

Youth Physical Activity Guidelines Toolkit

The Youth Physical Activity Guidelines Toolkit highlights strategies that schools, families, and communities can use to support youth physical activity. The toolkit can be used by anyone who promotes youth physical activity, including community leaders; physical education and health education teachers; physical activity coordinators at the school, district, and state levels; and physical activity practitioners working in health or community-based organizations. The toolkit includes fact sheets, PowerPoint® presentations, and user guides.

Tips for Teachers

This fact sheet provides specific tips for teachers to help promote physical activity and healthy eating in the classroom, through making water accessible, offering non-food rewards, not withholding activity as punishment, modeling healthy behaviors, and other strategies.

Strategies to Improve Quality Physical Education

This brief CDC report summarizes two key strategies for improving the quality of physical education: implementing a well-designed curriculum, and providing teachers with appropriate training and supervision. Activities within each of these strategies are suggested.

School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment and Planning Guide

The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning Guide 2014 is an online self-assessment and planning tool that schools can use to improve their health and safety policies and programs.

Access the PDF for Middle and High schools here: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/shi/pdf/middle-high-total-2014.pdf

School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity PowerPoint® Presentation

To help inform education and health professionals about the School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity, CDC has developed a free PowerPoint® presentation and accompanying materials that can be downloaded for public use. The Presentation can be used at state, regional, or local levels to introduce the guidelines to staff members at education and health agencies, schools, community groups, and other organizations interested in promoting healthy eating and physical activity through schools. It can be delivered at meetings, conferences, trainings of trainers, continuing education activities, or other public events, as well as used with individuals or teams.

Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (PECAT)

The Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (PECAT) is a self-assessment and planning guide developed by CDC. It is designed to help school districts and schools conduct clear, complete, and consistent analyses of physical education curricula, based upon national physical education standards.

Parents for Healthy Schools

This CDC report provides an overview of a healthy school environment with a focus on the school nutrition environment and services, physical education and physical activity, and managing chronic health conditions in schools; an overview of the framework for engaging parents in school health; and suggestions for how to use the resources. There is also a PowerPoint presentation that schools can use, and ideas for how parents can take action to improve school health environments.

Health and Academics

This fact sheet provides information highlighting/showcasing evidence regarding academic success and health.

Health and Academic Achievement Overview

This document provides evidence linking healthy eating and physical activity to academic achievement; evidence-driven messages with specific benefits to states, school districts, schools, parents, and students; specific, feasible, and effective actions to support healthy eating and physical activity in schools; key resources to learn more.

CDC’s Physical Activity Facts

This CDC website provides a brief overview of school-based physical activity facts including benefits of physical activity, long-term consequences of inactivity, and current participation in physical activity and physical education among youth. The website also links to other CDC resources related to youth physical activity.

Model Wellness Policy Language

This word document provides a template for creating a “Basic” wellness policy that can be adapted to meet your district’s wellness priorities. This template meets the minimum Federal standards for local school wellness policy implementation under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the Alliance for a Healthier Generation Healthy Schools Program “Bronze”-level recognition criteria, and minimum best practice standards accepted in the education and public health fields. Where appropriate, the template includes optional policy language school districts can use to establish a stronger policy that meets the Healthy Schools Program “Silver” or “Gold” levels. School districts should choose policy language that meets their current needs and also supports growth over time.