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Reframing the Obesity ConversationReframing the Obesity Conversation
How obesity is described, or framed, can affect whether a solution has popular or decision-maker support. Learn more about reframing the conversation.

 

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NYS Health Impact Statements

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) is pleased to announce the release of four new Health Impact Statements: “Increasing Physical Activity at Schools in New York State”, “Improving Nutrition at Schools in New York State”, “Implementing Food Standards in New York State”, and “Increasing Breastfeeding in New York State”. From 2013-2018, NYS DOH received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address the problem of obesity by increasing physical activity opportunities for students; improving the nutrition environment for students; implementing food service guidelines at community sites including work places, hospitals, municipalities and community-based organizations; and promoting, supporting and protecting breastfeeding in hospitals, health care practices, worksites and community organizations. The attached reports summarize the impact that this funding had on children and adults in NYS. Each report includes a description of the problem, the intervention, and the health impact. These reports have been approved for public use. Feel free to share them with partners or colleagues that are involved in initiatives to decrease obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and increase breastfeeding.

National Farm to School Month Fact Sheet

October is National Farm to School Month! This fact sheet offers an overview of National Farm to School Month and ideas for celebrating and taking action in your community.

Child Nutrition Site Visit Guide

The Child Nutrition Programs benefit millions of low-income children each day, providing healthy food both in and out of school. These programs are public policy at its best, and that is why it is critically important for advocates to invite Members of Congress, as well as state and local elected officials, to visit Child Nutrition Program sites. Seeing children engaged in activities and eating nutritious meals can move an elected official to become a champion for strengthening the programs. This fact sheet offers steps for organizing, planning and hosting a Child Nutrition site visit for Members of Congress, as well as state and local elected officials.

Social Determinants of Health

This website provides CDC resources for SDOH data, tools for action, programs, and policy. They may be used by people in public health, community organizations, and health care systems to assess SDOH and improve community well-being.

Fast Facts

The documents found at the links below provide facts from up-to-date studies and “fast facts” written in consumer friendly language. To reduce review time, materials developed using facts from these documents exactly as they are written will not need additional science review, which will reduce the overall product review time.

State Farm to School Positions Guide

Through this resource, stakeholders will find the information they need to strategically advocate for the creation of more state farm to school positions in state agencies and university Extension programs, including insight into the process of position creation and the benefits of these roles. Included are a list of existing state farm to school positions – both in state agencies and in university Extension offices – four state case studies, an analysis of the current landscape of state farm to school positions, and sample job descriptions for some of the positions featured in the resource.

State Farm to School Networks Toolkit

State farm to school networks are key to bringing together diverse sectors and stakeholders and creating a united voice and set of priorities to propel the movement. This toolkit is designed to demonstrate best practices and lessons learned from existing state farm to school networks and to provide users with key strategies and approaches for developing and sustaining state farm to school networks. The toolkit includes a primer on general network models and development, a deep dive into state farm to school network best practices, case studies highlighting successful tools and tactics, and an analysis on challenges for and the future of state farm to school networks.

School Fundraisers: Make Money and a Positive Impact!

Raising money through fundraisers can support the financial health of schools. Yet, when non-nutritious foods are sold, it is at the expense of the health and well-being of children and their families. Eating habits are greatly influenced by the types of foods and beverages that are available. When schools sell candy, cookies, and other unhealthy foods, they are increasing their availability. Schools across New York are changing how they fundraise—whether it’s to provide fun, family activities; to help community members recycle unwanted electronics; or to sell school promotional items—to make a positive impact in the community. Some of the most successful ideas are provided on this handout.

ESSA Resources

Right now, every state is putting together a comprehensive plan to ensure all students receive a fair, equitable, and high-quality education. These plans are required by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), recently passed by Congress. To help every student succeed, Voices for Healthy Kids is advocating for physical education to be included in every state’s ESSA plans. PE addresses the needs of the whole child, positively impacting their physical, mental and emotional health, making it a critical part of every child’s education. The resources below can help deliver an important message to education leaders in your state:

The Public Plate in New York State: Growing Health, Farms and Jobs with Local Food

Boosting public spending on fresh foods grown on New York State farms and served in schools, childcare centers, older adult centers, food pantries and other institutions, has the potential to improve health for more than six million New Yorkers, while increasing economic opportunities across the state. The new analysis of how food is purchased and consumed in public places reveals opportunities to improve current New York food procurement policies and practices in ways that will benefit communities across the state.

Parents for Healthy Kids

Parents for Healthy Kids is a national initiative created for parents, by parents, offering resources to help parents and caregivers become effective change agents in school and student health — includes this website and online community forum, school grants, and trainings.

USDA Professional Standards Training Database

USDA Professional Standards Training Database has over 500 low-cost or free trainings for school nutrition staff. This site allows school nutrition staff to search for training that meets their learning needs. Each listing contains information about the training, including how to access, developer, date, learning objectives covered, and more.

Drinking Water Safety in Schools

Drinking Water Safety in Schools graphically shows where lead can enter tap water in schools and provides an overview of steps to take to ensure tap water safety.

Healthy Hydration

Healthy Hydration teaches the benefits of drinking water in place of sugar-sweetened beverages

Parent Letter – Spanish

Customize the Action for Healthy Kids parent letter to remind parents of healthy ways to celebrate (Spanish)

Parent Letter – English

Customize the Action for Healthy Kids parent letter to remind parents of healthy ways to celebrate

Healthy School Pledge

Schools can make the Action for Healthy Kids Healthy School Pledge. Encourage posting the signed pledge on a bulletin board in the hallway.

Discover MyPlate Teacher’s Guide

The Discover MyPlate Teacher’s Guide includes six standards-based, inquiry-led, student-centered and teacher approved lessons for kindergarten.

NY Farm to School Resources

This website, run by NYS Agriculture and Markets, suggests resources for schools interested in starting a Farm to School program or participating in one.

Health Disparities Data Widget

Healthy People 2020’s data widget provides an easy way to find health disparities data related to the Healthy People 2020 objectives for the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs). The widget provides charts and graphs of disparities data that can be viewed by disparity type—including disability, education, income, location, race and ethnicity, and sex.

Healthy Schools Action Toolkit from NYC DOHMH

The newly released Healthy Schools Action Toolkit provides resources for elementary school administration, staff, families, and wellness councils. The Center for Health Equity has designed a toolkit to help schools create School Wellness Councils and School Wellness Policies to improve the health of the school community. As part of the toolkit, there are resources for principals, teachers, parents and students that will help: Promote Active Living: Ensure students get 60 minutes of daily physical activity through physical education, active recess, classroom physical activity breaks, active transportation to and from school and before- and after-school physical activity programs; and Promote Healthy Eating: Start by removing chocolate milk from your school menu to reduce the amount of sugar children consume daily. Serve plain (unflavored) 1% or skim milk instead.

Tools of Change: A Resource Catalog for Community Health

ChangeLab Solutions created a new catalog of resources for laws and policies to ensure everyday health for all, including access to affordable and healthy food and beverages and creating safe opportunities for physical activity.

Center for Healthy Food Access

The Food Trust, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, recently announced the Center for Healthy Food Access launch. Its goals are to promote access to nutrition and affordable food for children nationwide, while catalyzing new ideas and sustaining recent progress around food access. Some initiative efforts include strengthening SNAP and WIC, improving school food and water quality, developing healthy food access venues in underserved areas, and working with businesses on healthy food marketing.

Community Health Media Center Resources

The Community Health Media Center (CHMC) provides free and low-cost advertisements and materials for use by health departments and nonprofit organizations. The advertisements and materials focus on the built environment, nutrition, physical activity, obesity, and other chronic diseases or conditions. The CHMC includes television, radio, print, outdoor (e.g., billboard, transit), and web advertisements; as well as infographics and support materials such as brochures, fact sheets, flyers, posters, postcards. Browse the collection by visiting the CHMC website and creating an account.

Healthier Middle Schools: Everyone Can Help

Healthier Middle Schools: Everyone Can Help is a series of communication tools designed to help you engage teachers, principals, parents, food service managers and students in school wellness efforts. To support healthy food choices and physical activity at your school, a school-wide coordinated approach works best. USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service is providing these resources under its Team Nutrition initiative to help you bring everyone together to promote student wellness and prevent childhood obesity.

Best Practices for Healthy School Fundraisers

Use this brochure to help your school earn extra money for different activities, events, and equipment that keep students excited and engaged. This brochure provides ideas to use healthy choices for fundraising that sell only nonfood items or foods that meet the Smart Snacks nutrition standards. The four-fold brochure provides information on Smart Snack Requirements and fundraising ideas. And, there are four successful fundraising stories from schools that have raised money in a variety of ways.

A Guide to Smart Snacks in Schools

This colorful booklet provides an overview of Smart Snacks Standards and how to tell if a food/beverage meets the requirements. This is a ready-to-go resource for anyone that oversees the sale of foods/beverages to students on the school campus during the school day.

Team Nutrition USDA

Team Nutrition is an initiative of the USDA Food and Nutrition Service to support the Child Nutrition Programs through training and technical assistance for foodservice, nutrition education for children and their caregivers, and school and community support for healthy eating and physical activity. iInformation on how to apply can be found here: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/join-team-become-team-nutrition-school

Smarter Lunchrooms

Smarter Lunchrooms use easy no-cost and low-cost changes to encourage students to select, eat, and enjoy healthier foods in school without eliminating their choice. These interventions can maintain or improve revenue and increase participation.

Comprehensive Framework for Addressing the School Nutrition Environment and Services

This CDC framework provides school nutrition professionals, school health professionals, administrators, teachers, and parents detailed information on the components of a school nutrition environment and how, together, they influence a students’ access to healthy foods and beverages at school. Access the PDF here: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/nutrition/pdf/school_nutrition_framework_508tagged.pdf

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: School and Local Government Collaborations

The Local Government Commission and the Cities, Counties, and Schools Partnership produced this fact sheet in April 2007 showing how collaborative efforts between government officials and schools can join forces to reduce childhood obesity. It provides research resources and eight specific examples of policies (some of which are safe routes to schools initiatives), join use agreement, community garden programs, and fast food zoning policies.

School Wellness Policy and Practice: Meeting the Needs of Low-Income Students

The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) developed this guide in February 2006 for parents, school community leaders, and anti-hunger advocates addressing nutrition needs specifically for low-income students. The guide contains sample programs, policies, and key research to develop school wellness policies that meet the needs of vulnerable students.

Healthy School Food Policies: A Checklist

With the help of health and community activists, legislators, parents, and school officials, the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute developed this extensive checklist in June 2005. The checklist covers the school environment, quality, and educational opportunities regarding food, using reliable sources, for school administrators to replicate within their own organizations.

School Wellness Policies: A Policy Brief

Recommendations and strategies for strengthening school wellness policies are provided in this easy-to-read resource. Published in 2009 by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University, the report includes recommendations to address common weaknesses in school food policies such as incomplete policies, vague language, and food marketing in schools.

Healthy Community Design and Access to Healthy Food Legislation Database

This database of the National Conference of State Legislatures is a valuable tool for anyone interested in state-level legislation related to active living and healthy eating. Users can search by state, topic area(s), year, bill type, bill status, and/or bill number. The website also has a text search feature. This database can be used to develop local policy language and check that local policies are in line with state policies.

ENACT Local Policy Database

This policy database includes policies that have been enacted from a wide variety of states, jurisdictions, and topics. Users can refine their serach by filtering based on cities, counties, school districts, regional bodies, or special districts. The intended use is to provide sample policy language for jurisdictions looking to enact their own policies.

Smart Snacks in Schools

As of 2014-15, all foods sold at school during the school day need to meet nutrition standards. The Smart Snacks in School regulation applies to foods sold a la carte, in the school store, and vending machines. This one-pager summarizes the Smart Snacks standards, which were put in place as part of the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010.

Healthy Vending Guide

This document provides a guide to help organizations make healthy vending options available and attractive to children, youth, and adults. It includes healthy vending guidelines for food and beverage products, sample policies to support and sustain healthy vending, and marketing strategies to promote healthy options.

Developing a Healthy Beverage Vending Agreement

This fact sheet outlines key considerations for schools, including what to look for when soliciting a vendor, best practices to ensure a sound agreement, and ways for parents and other community members to get involved in the process.

CHLI Assessment

Community Healthy Living Index (CHLI) contains assessments for six key community settings: afterschool child care sites, early childhood programs, neighborhoods, schools, work sites and the community at large. Each assessment contains questions about policies and practices that support healthy lifestyles. Each question provides a “best practice” or improvement idea for sites to implement

CDC CHANGE Tool

This CHANGE tool helps community teams (such as coalitions) develop their community action plan. This tool walks community team members through the assessment process and helps define and prioritize possible areas of improvement. Community-At-Large Sector, Community Institution/Organization Sector; Health Care Sector; School Sector; Work Site Sector

School Meals: An Integral Part of the School Day

In this training, presenters from education and health discuss school nutrition and academic achievement, the changes brought by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, and the expanded options for providing school meals.

National Action Plan to Promote Health Through Increased Fruit and Vegetable Consumption 2015 Report Card

This report provides an update on the status of fruit and vegetable consumption in the US as of 2015. It provides a list of prioritized strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in the following settings: nutrition promotion and marketing; supermarkets and other retailers; fruit and vegetable suppliers; restaurants and other food service establishments; schools, child care, and other institutions serving children/adolescents; work places; health care and health organizations; research and evaluation; and state and federal policy.

Food Marketing in Schools

This website provides an overview of food marketing in schools and includes fact sheets, model policies and reports.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The Dietary Guidelines reflect the current body of nutrition science and provide recommendations to help Americans make healthy food and beverage choices and serve as the foundation for vital nutrition policies and programs across the United States. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the Nation’s go-to source for nutrition advice for public health professionals and is published every 5 years.

School Wellness Resource Kit

This comprehensive guide provides tools to assess and improve the school, classroom, and home environment, as well as staff wellness through the lens of two school districts in Colorado.

Marketing Matters

The complete report equips jurisdictions with the data and tools necessary to combat the marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to young children. It provides a detailed legal analysis of the options available, and discusses strategies communities can use to reduce unhealthy marketing. A policy poster is also available.

Tips for Teachers

This fact sheet provides specific tips for teachers to help promote physical activity and healthy eating in the classroom, through making water accessible, offering non-food rewards, not withholding activity as punishment, modeling healthy behaviors, and other strategies.

School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment and Planning Guide

The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning Guide 2014 is an online self-assessment and planning tool that schools can use to improve their health and safety policies and programs.

Access the PDF for Middle and High schools here: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/shi/pdf/middle-high-total-2014.pdf

School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity PowerPoint® Presentation

To help inform education and health professionals about the School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity, CDC has developed a free PowerPoint® presentation and accompanying materials that can be downloaded for public use. The Presentation can be used at state, regional, or local levels to introduce the guidelines to staff members at education and health agencies, schools, community groups, and other organizations interested in promoting healthy eating and physical activity through schools. It can be delivered at meetings, conferences, trainings of trainers, continuing education activities, or other public events, as well as used with individuals or teams.

Parents for Healthy Schools

This CDC report provides an overview of a healthy school environment with a focus on the school nutrition environment and services, physical education and physical activity, and managing chronic health conditions in schools; an overview of the framework for engaging parents in school health; and suggestions for how to use the resources. There is also a PowerPoint presentation that schools can use, and ideas for how parents can take action to improve school health environments.

Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools Fact Sheets

This website provides four CDC developed audience-specific fact sheets as a resource for school staff, parents, and young people to use to support and develop strong nutrition standards that can impact the health of students at school. These fact sheets are designed to answer commonly asked questions about the IOM’s Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools report and provide recommendations for implementing the standards. View the fact sheets near the end of the page under the “Smart Snacks” tab.

Health and Academics

This fact sheet provides information highlighting/showcasing evidence regarding academic success and health.

Health and Academic Achievement Overview

This document provides evidence linking healthy eating and physical activity to academic achievement; evidence-driven messages with specific benefits to states, school districts, schools, parents, and students; specific, feasible, and effective actions to support healthy eating and physical activity in schools; key resources to learn more.

CDC’s Nutrition and the Health of Young People

This CDC website provides a brief overview of school-based nutrition facts including benefits of healthy eating, consequences of a poor diet, current eating behaviors of young people, and the link between diet and academic performance. The website also links to other CDC resources related to school-based nutrition.

Model Wellness Policy Language

This word document provides a template for creating a “Basic” wellness policy that can be adapted to meet your district’s wellness priorities. This template meets the minimum Federal standards for local school wellness policy implementation under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the Alliance for a Healthier Generation Healthy Schools Program “Bronze”-level recognition criteria, and minimum best practice standards accepted in the education and public health fields. Where appropriate, the template includes optional policy language school districts can use to establish a stronger policy that meets the Healthy Schools Program “Silver” or “Gold” levels. School districts should choose policy language that meets their current needs and also supports growth over time.

Healthy Non-Food Rewards

This brief guide provides suggestions for healthy non-food rewards for elementary, middle, and high schools students.