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Reframing the Obesity ConversationReframing the Obesity Conversation
How obesity is described, or framed, can affect whether a solution has popular or decision-maker support. Learn more about reframing the conversation.

 

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All CHSC Related Resources

Included in the collection are informational materials and tools. To search by title, use the main search box located at the top of this page.

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Elements of a Complete Streets Policy

Smart Growth America and the National Complete Streets Coalition have revamped the ideal elements of a Complete Streets Policy. The elements serve as a national model of best practices that can be implemented in nearly all types of Complete Streets policies at all levels of governance. For communities considering a Complete Streets policy, this resource serves as a model; for communities with an existing Complete Streets policy, this resource provides guidance on areas for improvements.

Healthy School Pledge

Schools can make the Action for Healthy Kids Healthy School Pledge. Encourage posting the signed pledge on a bulletin board in the hallway.

Local Government Food Policy Database

The Growing Food Connections Local Government Policy Database is a searchable collection of local public policies that explicitly support community food systems. This database provides policymakers, government staff, and others interested in food policy with concrete examples of local public policies that have been adopted to address a range of food systems issues: rural and urban food production, farmland protection, transfer of development rights, food aggregation and distribution infrastructure, local food purchasing and procurement, healthy food access, food policy councils, food policy coordination, food system metrics, tax reductions and exemptions for food infrastructure, and much more.

Model and Sample Policy Language

Explore these resources when preparing to draft your local school wellness policy, and revisit them when putting the policy to action. You can also use these resources to compare your policy against model policies.

Summary of the Final Rule: Local School Wellness Policy Implementation Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

The wellness policy requirement was established by the Child Nutrition and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Reauthorization Act of 2004 and further strengthened by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). It requires each LEA participating in the National School Lunch Program and/or School Breakfast Program to develop a wellness policy. The final rule expands the requirements to strengthen policies and increase transparency. The responsibility for developing, implementing, and evaluating a wellness policy is placed at the local level, so the unique needs of each school under the LEA’s jurisdiction can be addressed.

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide

The National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) has created model policy language around physical activity in schools for replication and dissemination. This document is intended for school wellness advocates and school administrators.

School Wellness Policy and Practice: Meeting the Needs of Low-Income Students

The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) developed this guide in February 2006 for parents, school community leaders, and anti-hunger advocates addressing nutrition needs specifically for low-income students. The guide contains sample programs, policies, and key research to develop school wellness policies that meet the needs of vulnerable students.

Healthy School Food Policies: A Checklist

With the help of health and community activists, legislators, parents, and school officials, the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute developed this extensive checklist in June 2005. The checklist covers the school environment, quality, and educational opportunities regarding food, using reliable sources, for school administrators to replicate within their own organizations.

Healthy Community Design and Access to Healthy Food Legislation Database

This database of the National Conference of State Legislatures is a valuable tool for anyone interested in state-level legislation related to active living and healthy eating. Users can search by state, topic area(s), year, bill type, bill status, and/or bill number. The website also has a text search feature. This database can be used to develop local policy language and check that local policies are in line with state policies.

ENACT Local Policy Database

This policy database includes policies that have been enacted from a wide variety of states, jurisdictions, and topics. Users can refine their serach by filtering based on cities, counties, school districts, regional bodies, or special districts. The intended use is to provide sample policy language for jurisdictions looking to enact their own policies.

Model Healthy Food System Resolution

ChangeLab Solutions developed this Model Healthy Food System Resolution to help community members and policymakers start their own conversation about how the local government can support a healthier food system. It suggests numerous actions that the local government could take to understand the local food system, and it establishes a Food Policy Council to continue the food system dialogue after the resolution is enacted.

Model Wellness Policy Language

This word document provides a template for creating a “Basic” wellness policy that can be adapted to meet your district’s wellness priorities. This template meets the minimum Federal standards for local school wellness policy implementation under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the Alliance for a Healthier Generation Healthy Schools Program “Bronze”-level recognition criteria, and minimum best practice standards accepted in the education and public health fields. Where appropriate, the template includes optional policy language school districts can use to establish a stronger policy that meets the Healthy Schools Program “Silver” or “Gold” levels. School districts should choose policy language that meets their current needs and also supports growth over time.