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Reframing the Obesity ConversationReframing the Obesity Conversation
How obesity is described, or framed, can affect whether a solution has popular or decision-maker support. Learn more about reframing the conversation.

 

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NYS Health Impact Statements

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) is pleased to announce the release of four new Health Impact Statements: “Increasing Physical Activity at Schools in New York State”, “Improving Nutrition at Schools in New York State”, “Implementing Food Standards in New York State”, and “Increasing Breastfeeding in New York State”. From 2013-2018, NYS DOH received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address the problem of obesity by increasing physical activity opportunities for students; improving the nutrition environment for students; implementing food service guidelines at community sites including work places, hospitals, municipalities and community-based organizations; and promoting, supporting and protecting breastfeeding in hospitals, health care practices, worksites and community organizations. The attached reports summarize the impact that this funding had on children and adults in NYS. Each report includes a description of the problem, the intervention, and the health impact. These reports have been approved for public use. Feel free to share them with partners or colleagues that are involved in initiatives to decrease obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and increase breastfeeding.

Leisure-Time Physical Activity among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016

“The report “Leisure-Time Physical Activity among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016” presents the estimates of New Yorkers participating in leisure-time physical activity by county in NYS. According to the report, most adults (73.7%) in New York State participate in leisure-time physical activity; participation rates vary by county from 62.8% to 85.3%.
• Counties outside New York City with the highest rates are Tompkins (85.3%), Saratoga (83.0%) and Livingston (81.2%).
• Counties outside New York City with the lowest rates are Lewis (66.2%), Montgomery (67.5%) and Yates (67.5%).
• Among New York City boroughs, the rate is highest in Manhattan (79.7%) and lowest in Bronx (62.8%).”

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016

“The report “Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016” presents the prevalence of daily sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption by county in NYS. SSBs are drinks with added sugar including: non-diet soft drinks/sodas, flavored juice drinks, sports drinks, sweetened tea, coffee drinks, energy drinks, and electrolyte replacement drinks. According to the report, 23.2% of adults drink at least one SSB per day in NYS. Within NYS, the prevalence of daily SSB consumption varies by county from 15.6% to 36.8%.
• Counties outside New York City with the highest prevalence are Jefferson (36.8%), Genesee (34.9%) and Livingston (33.3%).
• Counties outside New York City with the lowest prevalence are Yates (15.6%), Hamilton (16.4%), and Westchester (17.8%).
• Among New York City boroughs, prevalence is highest in Bronx (30.9%) and lowest in Richmond (16.7%).”

Safety Demonstration Projects: Case Studies from Orlando, FL, Lexington, KY, and South Bend, IN

To test out creative approaches to safer street design, the National Complete Streets Coalition launched the Safe Streets Academy. We worked with three cities around the country to build skills in safer street design, creative placemaking, and community engagement, then helped the cities put these skills into practice. Through demonstration projects, the City of Orlando, FL, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, KY, and the City of South Bend, IN transformed their streets, intersections, and neighborhoods into slower, safer places for people. Communities around the country can learn from the stories of these demonstration projects to test out low-cost ways to create safer streets.

These case studies highlight lessons learned from these demonstration projects, including how the projects helped these cities build trust with the community and with other jurisdictions, test out new approaches for safer street design and make quick adjustments as needed, and change the conversation about the importance of slower, safer streets.

Sugary Drinks in America: Who’s Drinking What and How Much?

Over the last two decades, the sugary drink landscape has been changing. Between a plethora of new drinks on the market and reported changes in beverage sales, many people are confused or concerned about the current state of sugary drink sales and consumption patterns. This report describes the consumption and sales of sugary drinks in the United States over time and among demographic subgroups. Specifically, the report defines sugary drinks, describes health issues related to sugary drink consumption, and answers questions about how many sugary drinks are being consumed in the US and whether consumption patterns differ by age, race/ethnicity, and income.

Improving Mobility Access through Complete Streets and Mobility Management

In this brief, the National Center for Mobility Management takes a look at mobility management and Complete Streets concepts and then identifies examples of communities where the initiatives — including the people and organizations that lead these efforts— collaborate to establish connected programs. We identify opportunities for mobility management professionals to consider a focus on Complete Streets projects in their work. The philosophy and operations of mobility management and Complete Streets are more similar than not. Both have the purpose of enhancing access, mobility, and equity in communities. Professionals in each of these sectors have opportunities to leverage resources and build sustainable and vibrant projects that ultimately affect the well-being of our communities.

Financial Implications of Healthy Vending

Many vendors have found that revenue is unaffected by implementing healthy vending, and some vendors have experienced an increase in sales when they increased healthier options. The transition can be coupled with nutrition education, taste tests, promotions, and changes to pricing to support healthy choices

The Public Plate in New York State: Growing Health, Farms and Jobs with Local Food

Boosting public spending on fresh foods grown on New York State farms and served in schools, childcare centers, older adult centers, food pantries and other institutions, has the potential to improve health for more than six million New Yorkers, while increasing economic opportunities across the state. The new analysis of how food is purchased and consumed in public places reveals opportunities to improve current New York food procurement policies and practices in ways that will benefit communities across the state.

New York State Prevention Agenda Dashboard – State Level

Interested to see how New York is making progress on Prevention Agenda goals? Check out the NYS Prevention Agenda Dashboard which tracks progress on a variety of health indicators, including obesity (#19- #22) and breastfeeding (#49).

Implementing Healthier Food Service Guidelines in Hospital and Federal Worksite Cafeterias

To better understand the facilitators and barriers of implementing healthy food service guidelines, CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) supported a project by the North Carolina Institute of Public Health (NCIPH) to examine five hospitals and four federal worksite food service operators across the country. The findings are published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics and describe the experiences of food service operators in implementing healthy food service guidelines and identifies implementation facilitators and barriers. NCIPH conducted additional follow-up with food service operators that were most successful in implementing the food service guidelines and published five Success Stories at the following websites that highlight the implementation challenges and solutions and synthesized keys to success for each individual hospital or federal worksite food service operator.

Complete Streets Policy Equity and Public Transit Reports

As Complete Streets Policies are becoming increasingly popular researchers seek to understand how these provisions lead to equitable implementation and higher physical activity levels. These two latest reports from the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago examine both the association between complete streets policies and public transit use and equity prioritization in policies.

New BRFSS Brief Report: Overweight and Obesity Among NYS Adults, 2015

The New York State (NYS) Department of Health (DOH) is pleased to announce the release of a new report based on data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an annual statewide telephone survey of adults developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and administered by the NYSDOH. The brief report, “Overweight and Obesity among New York State Adults, 2015,” provides updated prevalence estimates of both overweight and obesity in the state. According to the report, one-quarter (25.0%) of adults in NYS are obese and another 34.5% are overweight, an estimated 8.4 million residents. The prevalence of obesity in NYS is higher among adults who are non-Hispanic black or Hispanic (30.9% and 29.3%, respectively), earn an annual household income less than $50,000 (28.9%), have less than a college education (28.6%), are currently living with a disability (37.2%), and those who live outside of New York City (26.9%). The New York State Prevention Agenda 2013-2018 has identified reducing obesity in adults as a focus area and established an objective to reduce obesity by 5% among adults and by 10% among adults living with disabilities. More information about the Prevention Agenda and the recommended strategies for addressing obesity in adults can be found on the NYSDOH website: http://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/prevention_agenda/2013-2017/ This brief has been approved for public release.

New York State-New York City Regional Food Hubs Task Force Final Action Plan

Recommendations of the Regional Food Hubs Task Force. In December 2014, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo formed the New York State and New York City Regional Food Hub Task Force at the statewide Farm-to-Table Upstate-Downstate Agricultural Summit. The goal of the Upstate-Downstate Summit was to boost production and consumption of New York State fresh and value-added foods. The Task force explored tools to increase access to fresh food, by helping smaller producers to reach local downstate markets. The Task Force was charged with identifying capital investments and policy solutions that advance these goals. Based on its research and analysis, the Task Force recommends the development of a NYS-NYC Regional Food Hubs System, organized within a framework of physical and programmatic initiatives to be developed and implemented in partnership with local stakeholders.

Perspectives of Urban Corner Store Owners and Managers on Community Health Problems and Solutions

Urban corner store interventions have been implemented to improve access to and promote purchase of healthy foods. However, the perspectives of store owners and managers, who deliver and shape these interventions in collaboration with nonprofit, government, and academic partners, have been largely overlooked. The study sought to explore the views of store owners and managers on the role of their stores in the community and their beliefs about health problems and solutions in the community.

Running a Food Hub-Lessons Learned from the Field

In recent years, several surveys—including the 2013 National Food Hub Survey and the Food Hub Benchmarking Study—have collected data on U.S. food hubs. What seems to be lacking from the current research on food hubs is information on operations and “lessons learned” from those involved in starting and operating food hubs. To help fill this void, interviews were conducted with the leaders of 11 food hubs, using an open-ended, free-flowing format. This allowed for maximum flexibility during each interview and the ability to further capture the unique nature of each entity. The food hubs, located throughout the United States, represent a diversity of organization types, product offerings, operation structures, and missions.

Resources to Reduce Sugary Drink Consumption Among Latino Kids

Salud America! has released new materials on sugary drink consumption and Latino kids, including a research review, issue brief, and infographics. These new resources, available in English and Spanish, add to Salud America!’s library of existing materials on topics such as healthier schools, active spaces, healthy weight, and health equity.

2016 Food Policy Council Report

The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future recently released the “2016 Food Policy Council Report,” which provides a summary of results from the 2016 Food Policy Council (FPC) survey. This report lists five active FPCs in New York State.

Report Highlights How Complete Streets Support Equity

Researchers at the University of Illinois, Chicago, published a report about how Complete Streets support equity. This report, “Prioritizing Transportation Equity through Complete Streets,” examines results from eight communities that chose to prioritize equity in their Complete Streets policies. The report presents lessons and strategies that the eight communities learned; prioritizing equity was found difficult to put into practice.

Local School Wellness Policy Research Briefs

CDC and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-supported Bridging the Gap (BTG) research program developed a series of briefs highlighting opportunities to support wellness policies through evidence-based strategies. These briefs provide an assessment of policies across school districts nationwide during the 2012-2013 school year, related to seven wellness policy components. They also highlight areas of opportunity for state agencies, school districts, and schools to strengthen wellness policy components.

Stimulating Supermarket Development: A New Day for New York

The New York Supermarket Commission developed this report which makes nine recommendations, with the goal of protecting the health of children and families by ensuring access to affordable nutritious food. To reach this goal, they call on the city and state to put policies into place that ensure healthy retail.

Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016

This report provides a detailed picture of the status of biking and walking in the United States. There is a significant amount of national and state-level data, case studies of communities which have been able to increase access to walking and biking, and tips for implementation in diverse communities.

Healthy Food and Small Stores

This report identify ways to overcome distribution challenges in the small food retail environment in ways that are profitable for businesses and provide better access to healthy food in stores.

Incentives for Change: Rewarding Healthy Improvements to Small Food Stores

This brief offers suggested incentives for small food retailers. Incentives discussed include: education on local regulations, waiving administrative requirements, fees or taxes, lowering up-front costs to provide healthier options, training for owners, store renovations, and promotion to build business among new customers.

The Best Complete Streets Policies of 2016

The National Complete Streets Coalition examines and scores Complete Streets policies each year, comparing adopted policy language to the ideal. Ideal policies refine a community’s vision for transportation, provide for many types of users, complement community needs, and establish a flexible project delivery approach necessary for an effective Complete Streets process and outcome. Different types of policy statements are included in this examination, including legislation, resolutions, executive orders, departmental policies, and policies adopted by an elected board.

Complete Streets: Guide to Answering the Costs Question

This guide provides four overarching points to make in answering cost questions. The effectiveness of each depends upon the listener—some will resonate more with one audience than another. We give general guidance to the most appropriate audiences for each point, as well as general tips when discussing these topics in your community. We encourage you to use these examples as a starting point. Each point made below is illustrated in a companion PowerPoint slide. A thumbnail image of the slide and its corresponding slide number appear next to the text examples. You should not use the whole PowerPoint presentation to make your case locally. Instead, select the slides that are appropriate to your audience and situation and augment those slides with local facts and stories.

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) are an essential resource for health professional and policymakers. Based on the latest science, they provide guidance on how children and adults can improve their health through physical activity. It also provides ways to help consumers understand the benefits of physical activity and how to make it a part of their regular routine.

Healthy Corner Store Initiative

The Food Trust created the Healthy Corner Store Initiative to support corner store owners committed to increasing the healthy food inventory in their stores and to encourage customers to make healthier choices. This report discusses the Healthy Corner Store Initiative model, programs, lessons learned, and evaluation.

National Action Plan to Promote Health Through Increased Fruit and Vegetable Consumption 2015 Report Card

This report provides an update on the status of fruit and vegetable consumption in the US as of 2015. It provides a list of prioritized strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in the following settings: nutrition promotion and marketing; supermarkets and other retailers; fruit and vegetable suppliers; restaurants and other food service establishments; schools, child care, and other institutions serving children/adolescents; work places; health care and health organizations; research and evaluation; and state and federal policy.

Food Marketing in Schools

This website provides an overview of food marketing in schools and includes fact sheets, model policies and reports.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The Dietary Guidelines reflect the current body of nutrition science and provide recommendations to help Americans make healthy food and beverage choices and serve as the foundation for vital nutrition policies and programs across the United States. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the Nation’s go-to source for nutrition advice for public health professionals and is published every 5 years.

Health and Academic Achievement Overview

This document provides evidence linking healthy eating and physical activity to academic achievement; evidence-driven messages with specific benefits to states, school districts, schools, parents, and students; specific, feasible, and effective actions to support healthy eating and physical activity in schools; key resources to learn more.