NYS Health Impact Statements

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) is pleased to announce the release of four new Health Impact Statements: “Increasing Physical Activity at Schools in New York State”, “Improving Nutrition at Schools in New York State”, “Implementing Food Standards in New York State”, and “Increasing Breastfeeding in New York State”. From 2013-2018, NYS DOH received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address the problem of obesity by increasing physical activity opportunities for students; improving the nutrition environment for students; implementing food service guidelines at community sites including work places, hospitals, municipalities and community-based organizations; and promoting, supporting and protecting breastfeeding in hospitals, health care practices, worksites and community organizations. The attached reports summarize the impact that this funding had on children and adults in NYS. Each report includes a description of the problem, the intervention, and the health impact. These reports have been approved for public use. Feel free to share them with partners or colleagues that are involved in initiatives to decrease obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and increase breastfeeding.

Active transportation CSPAP Healthy Meetings Physical activity before and after school Physical activity during school Physical Education Recess School Nutrition Wellness Committees

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016

“The report “Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016” presents the prevalence of daily sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption by county in NYS. SSBs are drinks with added sugar including: non-diet soft drinks/sodas, flavored juice drinks, sports drinks, sweetened tea, coffee drinks, energy drinks, and electrolyte replacement drinks. According to the report, 23.2% of adults drink at least one SSB per day in NYS. Within NYS, the prevalence of daily SSB consumption varies by county from 15.6% to 36.8%.
• Counties outside New York City with the highest prevalence are Jefferson (36.8%), Genesee (34.9%) and Livingston (33.3%).
• Counties outside New York City with the lowest prevalence are Yates (15.6%), Hamilton (16.4%), and Westchester (17.8%).
• Among New York City boroughs, prevalence is highest in Bronx (30.9%) and lowest in Richmond (16.7%).”

Food Retail

The Ultimate Guide to Creating Walkable Streets

“Here at Strong Towns, we’re advocates for a simple concept we like to call “”slow the cars”” because we’ve seen in city after city that slowing down cars makes our communities more prosperous and resilient — not to mention safer.

But, while this concept is simple, the reasoning behind it and the path to get to safer streets is, by no means, easy. Today, we’re sharing our ultimate guide to building slower, more walkable streets, filled with helpful articles and resources you can use to #slowthecars in your town. We’ve broken it down into 4 key sections that will explain why we need walkable streets, how to tell if your streets aren’t walkable, and resources for building walkable streets, plus inspiring stories that will demonstrate how to build safer streets.”

Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

How to Turn a Stroad into a Street (or a Road)

“Our national transportation conversation has us obsessing over finding more money to continue to do the same thing. This is only making us poorer.

Instead, we need to focus on finding ways to make better use of our existing investments. This means we need to spend our energy converting our most expensive, least productive and most dangerous transportation investment — our stroads — into either wealth-producing streets (to create a place) or highly productive roads (to connect productive places). The website shows you how to do just that.”

Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

Child Nutrition Site Visit Guide

The Child Nutrition Programs benefit millions of low-income children each day, providing healthy food both in and out of school. These programs are public policy at its best, and that is why it is critically important for advocates to invite Members of Congress, as well as state and local elected officials, to visit Child Nutrition Program sites. Seeing children engaged in activities and eating nutritious meals can move an elected official to become a champion for strengthening the programs. This fact sheet offers steps for organizing, planning and hosting a Child Nutrition site visit for Members of Congress, as well as state and local elected officials.

Farm to School

Streets as Places Action Pack

This user-friendly guide addresses the common challenges local advocates face when working to improve streets. Are you looking to create better streets in your neighborhood or community? Have you gotten discouraged by bureaucratic red tape or simple lack of communication? Or, are you passionate about great streets but struggling to get neighbors or city officials to share your enthusiasm or vision for people-centered public spaces?

Active transportation Community Engagement Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

Back to most recently added Resources »