Elements of a Complete Streets Policy

Smart Growth America and the National Complete Streets Coalition have revamped the ideal elements of a Complete Streets Policy. The elements serve as a national model of best practices that can be implemented in nearly all types of Complete Streets policies at all levels of governance. For communities considering a Complete Streets policy, this resource serves as a model; for communities with an existing Complete Streets policy, this resource provides guidance on areas for improvements.

Complete Streets Policy

Local Government Food Policy Database

The Growing Food Connections Local Government Policy Database is a searchable collection of local public policies that explicitly support community food systems. This database provides policymakers, government staff, and others interested in food policy with concrete examples of local public policies that have been adopted to address a range of food systems issues: rural and urban food production, farmland protection, transfer of development rights, food aggregation and distribution infrastructure, local food purchasing and procurement, healthy food access, food policy councils, food policy coordination, food system metrics, tax reductions and exemptions for food infrastructure, and much more.

Community Healthy Food Access Healthy Food Environment

Model and Sample Policy Language

Explore these resources when preparing to draft your local school wellness policy, and revisit them when putting the policy to action. You can also use these resources to compare your policy against model policies.

School Wellness Policy

Summary of the Final Rule: Local School Wellness Policy Implementation Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

The wellness policy requirement was established by the Child Nutrition and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Reauthorization Act of 2004 and further strengthened by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). It requires each LEA participating in the National School Lunch Program and/or School Breakfast Program to develop a wellness policy. The final rule expands the requirements to strengthen policies and increase transparency. The responsibility for developing, implementing, and evaluating a wellness policy is placed at the local level, so the unique needs of each school under the LEA’s jurisdiction can be addressed.

School Wellness Policy

District Policy Restricting the Advertising of Food and Beverages Not Permitted to be Sold on School Grounds

The National Policy and Legal Analysis Network (NPLAN), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, created this sample policy in February 2009 to restrict advertising of food and beverages on school grounds. This document serves as an example policy that includes the purpose and goals, appropriate policy language, and key definitions.

Competitive Foods Food Marketing in Schools School Nutrition School Wellness Policy

School Wellness Policy and Practice: Meeting the Needs of Low-Income Students

The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) developed this guide in February 2006 for parents, school community leaders, and anti-hunger advocates addressing nutrition needs specifically for low-income students. The guide contains sample programs, policies, and key research to develop school wellness policies that meet the needs of vulnerable students.

Competitive Foods Food Marketing in Schools School Nutrition School Wellness Policy

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