NYS Health Impact Statements

The New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) is pleased to announce the release of four new Health Impact Statements: “Increasing Physical Activity at Schools in New York State”, “Improving Nutrition at Schools in New York State”, “Implementing Food Standards in New York State”, and “Increasing Breastfeeding in New York State”. From 2013-2018, NYS DOH received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address the problem of obesity by increasing physical activity opportunities for students; improving the nutrition environment for students; implementing food service guidelines at community sites including work places, hospitals, municipalities and community-based organizations; and promoting, supporting and protecting breastfeeding in hospitals, health care practices, worksites and community organizations. The attached reports summarize the impact that this funding had on children and adults in NYS. Each report includes a description of the problem, the intervention, and the health impact. These reports have been approved for public use. Feel free to share them with partners or colleagues that are involved in initiatives to decrease obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and increase breastfeeding.

Active transportation CSPAP Healthy Meetings Physical activity before and after school Physical activity during school Physical Education Recess School Nutrition Wellness Committees

Leisure-Time Physical Activity among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016

“The report “Leisure-Time Physical Activity among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016” presents the estimates of New Yorkers participating in leisure-time physical activity by county in NYS. According to the report, most adults (73.7%) in New York State participate in leisure-time physical activity; participation rates vary by county from 62.8% to 85.3%.
• Counties outside New York City with the highest rates are Tompkins (85.3%), Saratoga (83.0%) and Livingston (81.2%).
• Counties outside New York City with the lowest rates are Lewis (66.2%), Montgomery (67.5%) and Yates (67.5%).
• Among New York City boroughs, the rate is highest in Manhattan (79.7%) and lowest in Bronx (62.8%).”

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016

“The report “Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption among New York State Adults by County, BRFSS 2016” presents the prevalence of daily sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption by county in NYS. SSBs are drinks with added sugar including: non-diet soft drinks/sodas, flavored juice drinks, sports drinks, sweetened tea, coffee drinks, energy drinks, and electrolyte replacement drinks. According to the report, 23.2% of adults drink at least one SSB per day in NYS. Within NYS, the prevalence of daily SSB consumption varies by county from 15.6% to 36.8%.
• Counties outside New York City with the highest prevalence are Jefferson (36.8%), Genesee (34.9%) and Livingston (33.3%).
• Counties outside New York City with the lowest prevalence are Yates (15.6%), Hamilton (16.4%), and Westchester (17.8%).
• Among New York City boroughs, prevalence is highest in Bronx (30.9%) and lowest in Richmond (16.7%).”

Food Retail

Safety Demonstration Projects: Case Studies from Orlando, FL, Lexington, KY, and South Bend, IN

To test out creative approaches to safer street design, the National Complete Streets Coalition launched the Safe Streets Academy. We worked with three cities around the country to build skills in safer street design, creative placemaking, and community engagement, then helped the cities put these skills into practice. Through demonstration projects, the City of Orlando, FL, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, KY, and the City of South Bend, IN transformed their streets, intersections, and neighborhoods into slower, safer places for people. Communities around the country can learn from the stories of these demonstration projects to test out low-cost ways to create safer streets.

These case studies highlight lessons learned from these demonstration projects, including how the projects helped these cities build trust with the community and with other jurisdictions, test out new approaches for safer street design and make quick adjustments as needed, and change the conversation about the importance of slower, safer streets.

Active transportation Complete Streets Implementation

Sugary Drinks in America: Who’s Drinking What and How Much?

Over the last two decades, the sugary drink landscape has been changing. Between a plethora of new drinks on the market and reported changes in beverage sales, many people are confused or concerned about the current state of sugary drink sales and consumption patterns. This report describes the consumption and sales of sugary drinks in the United States over time and among demographic subgroups. Specifically, the report defines sugary drinks, describes health issues related to sugary drink consumption, and answers questions about how many sugary drinks are being consumed in the US and whether consumption patterns differ by age, race/ethnicity, and income.

Healthy Food Environment

Improving Mobility Access through Complete Streets and Mobility Management

In this brief, the National Center for Mobility Management takes a look at mobility management and Complete Streets concepts and then identifies examples of communities where the initiatives — including the people and organizations that lead these efforts— collaborate to establish connected programs. We identify opportunities for mobility management professionals to consider a focus on Complete Streets projects in their work. The philosophy and operations of mobility management and Complete Streets are more similar than not. Both have the purpose of enhancing access, mobility, and equity in communities. Professionals in each of these sectors have opportunities to leverage resources and build sustainable and vibrant projects that ultimately affect the well-being of our communities.

Complete Streets Implementation

Financial Implications of Healthy Vending

Many vendors have found that revenue is unaffected by implementing healthy vending, and some vendors have experienced an increase in sales when they increased healthier options. The transition can be coupled with nutrition education, taste tests, promotions, and changes to pricing to support healthy choices

Vending

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