Streets as Places Action Pack

This user-friendly guide addresses the common challenges local advocates face when working to improve streets. Are you looking to create better streets in your neighborhood or community? Have you gotten discouraged by bureaucratic red tape or simple lack of communication? Or, are you passionate about great streets but struggling to get neighbors or city officials to share your enthusiasm or vision for people-centered public spaces?

Active transportation Community Engagement Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

Pedestrians First: Tools for a Walkable City

Walkability is a crucial first step in creating sustainable transportation in an urban environment. Effectively understanding and measuring the complex ecology of walkability has proven challenging for many organizations and governments, given the various levels of policy-making and implementation involved. In the past, Western and Eurocentric standards have permeated measurement attempts and have included data collection practices that are too complicated to have utility in many parts of the world or at a level beyond that of the neighborhood. In order to expand the measurement of walkability to more places and to promote a better understanding of walkability, ITDP has developed Pedestrians First. This tool will facilitate the understanding and the measurement of the features that promote walkability in urban environments around the world at multiple levels. With a better global understanding of walkability, and more consistent and frequent measurement of the walkability of urban environments, decision-makers will be empowered to enact policies that create more walkable urban areas.

Active transportation Complete Streets Implementation

School Fundraisers: Make Money and a Positive Impact!

Raising money through fundraisers can support the financial health of schools. Yet, when non-nutritious foods are sold, it is at the expense of the health and well-being of children and their families. Eating habits are greatly influenced by the types of foods and beverages that are available. When schools sell candy, cookies, and other unhealthy foods, they are increasing their availability. Schools across New York are changing how they fundraise—whether it’s to provide fun, family activities; to help community members recycle unwanted electronics; or to sell school promotional items—to make a positive impact in the community. Some of the most successful ideas are provided on this handout.

Fundraising Healthy Food Environment School Nutrition Staff Involvement

Kid Power Ups

Kid Power Ups are short, interactive videos that get kids dancing and moving—the ideal brain break to help kids re-focus and learn more. These activity breaks also help other children around the world. It’s a winning combination of kids-helping-kids, and teachers and students all over the U.S. are loving it!

CSPAP Physical activity during school

Get Rolling With a Bike Train Program

This handout covers frequently asked questions for starting a bike train program. This resource is great for school staff and principals!

With a bike train, a group of students bike to school together, accompanied by adults who make sure students stay safe and have fun. A bike train is a fun and easy way for kids to
safely get physical activity on the way to or from school and a great way for students who live too far to conveniently walk to participate in Safe Routes to School.

Active transportation Safe Routes to School

Comparison of Nutrition Guidelines for Prepared Food

Increasing access to healthier foods and beverages in public places is a fast-growing movement across the country. This resource provides comparisons of nutrition-based and food-based standards for prepared foods sold or served at catered meetings and events, cafeterias and cafes, concessions stands, university campuses, and other public and private food service settings. Also included is a comparison of beverage standards for food service settings.

Food/Beverage Standards Healthy Food Environment Vending

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