The Ultimate Guide to Creating Walkable Streets

“Here at Strong Towns, we’re advocates for a simple concept we like to call “”slow the cars”” because we’ve seen in city after city that slowing down cars makes our communities more prosperous and resilient — not to mention safer.

But, while this concept is simple, the reasoning behind it and the path to get to safer streets is, by no means, easy. Today, we’re sharing our ultimate guide to building slower, more walkable streets, filled with helpful articles and resources you can use to #slowthecars in your town. We’ve broken it down into 4 key sections that will explain why we need walkable streets, how to tell if your streets aren’t walkable, and resources for building walkable streets, plus inspiring stories that will demonstrate how to build safer streets.”

Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

How to Turn a Stroad into a Street (or a Road)

“Our national transportation conversation has us obsessing over finding more money to continue to do the same thing. This is only making us poorer.

Instead, we need to focus on finding ways to make better use of our existing investments. This means we need to spend our energy converting our most expensive, least productive and most dangerous transportation investment — our stroads — into either wealth-producing streets (to create a place) or highly productive roads (to connect productive places). The website shows you how to do just that.”

Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

Safety Demonstration Projects: Case Studies from Orlando, FL, Lexington, KY, and South Bend, IN

To test out creative approaches to safer street design, the National Complete Streets Coalition launched the Safe Streets Academy. We worked with three cities around the country to build skills in safer street design, creative placemaking, and community engagement, then helped the cities put these skills into practice. Through demonstration projects, the City of Orlando, FL, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, KY, and the City of South Bend, IN transformed their streets, intersections, and neighborhoods into slower, safer places for people. Communities around the country can learn from the stories of these demonstration projects to test out low-cost ways to create safer streets.

These case studies highlight lessons learned from these demonstration projects, including how the projects helped these cities build trust with the community and with other jurisdictions, test out new approaches for safer street design and make quick adjustments as needed, and change the conversation about the importance of slower, safer streets.

Active transportation Complete Streets Implementation

Introducing the Assembly: Civic Design Guidelines

“The Center for Active Design is thrilled to announce the release of the Assembly: Civic Design Guidelines, a groundbreaking playbook for creating well-designed and well-maintained public spaces as a force for building trust and healing divisions in local communities.

The Assembly Guidelines capture the culmination of four years of research and collaboration—with input from 200+ studies, 50+ cities, and dozens of expert advisors—to provide evidence-based design and maintenance strategies for creating cities where people trust each other, have confidence in local institutions, and actively work together to address local priorities.

Funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, this is a pivotal and timely resource for anyone who designs, builds, manages, studies, or advocates for public space. Practitioners can use the Assembly Guidelines in a variety of ways: apply the checklist to a public space project; initiate dialogue about local civic challenges; test tactical, low-cost design interventions; and shape decision-making around capital investments.

CfAD is delighted to share the Assembly Guidelines as an inspiring, practical tool that serves as a call to action for designing and maintaining great public spaces for all.”

Active transportation Complete Streets Implementation

Mobility Equity Framework: How to Make Transportation Work for People

For too long, transportation planning has focused on cars rather than people while neglecting communities of color and low-income neighborhoods. This framework offers planners and community advocates a step-by-step guide to a more community-centered transportation planning process that focuses on the mobility needs of communities and puts affected communities at the center of decision-making.

Community Engagement Complete Streets Policy

New York Academy of Medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine is dedicated to advancing the health and well-being of people living in cities. They do this through our Institute for Urban Health, home of interdisciplinary research, evaluation, policy, and program initiatives; our world class historical library of medicine and public health and its active programming in history, the humanities, and the arts; and their Fellows a network of more than 2,000 experts elected by their peers from across the professions affecting health.

Arts, Culture and Transportation: A Creative Placemaking Field Scan

Arts, Culture and Transportation: A Creative Placemaking Field Scan is a rigorous national examination of creative placemaking in the transportation planning process. Released in partnership with ArtPlace America, this new resource identifies ways that transportation professionals can integrate artists to deliver transportation projects more smoothly, improve safety, and build community support.

Active transportation Community Engagement Complete Streets Implementation Complete Streets Policy

Healthy Schools Action Toolkit from NYC DOHMH

The newly released Healthy Schools Action Toolkit provides resources for elementary school administration, staff, families, and wellness councils. The Center for Health Equity has designed a toolkit to help schools create School Wellness Councils and School Wellness Policies to improve the health of the school community. As part of the toolkit, there are resources for principals, teachers, parents and students that will help: Promote Active Living: Ensure students get 60 minutes of daily physical activity through physical education, active recess, classroom physical activity breaks, active transportation to and from school and before- and after-school physical activity programs; and Promote Healthy Eating: Start by removing chocolate milk from your school menu to reduce the amount of sugar children consume daily. Serve plain (unflavored) 1% or skim milk instead.

Physical activity during school Physical Education Recess Safe Routes to School School Nutrition School Wellness Policy Wellness Committees

Complete Streets Policy Equity and Public Transit Reports

As Complete Streets Policies are becoming increasingly popular researchers seek to understand how these provisions lead to equitable implementation and higher physical activity levels. These two latest reports from the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago examine both the association between complete streets policies and public transit use and equity prioritization in policies.

Active transportation Complete Streets Policy

Back to most recently added Resources »